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1541 Chapman Hill Road
Chapman Hill, WA  6280

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Floral Kingdom

The Proteaceae are an ancient family, probably one of the oldest groups of flowering plants.  The ancestors of todays proteas growing at Hippo Lakes and Protea Pride were present in Gondwanaland long before it began breaking up 300 million years ago at a time when Australia and Africa were part of a large land mass.  Proteaceae were divided into two sub-families; Proteoideae and Grevilleoideae.

The South African Proteaceae family is divided into 13 natural groups.  Of these Aulax and Leucadendron are dioecious, being separate male and female plants, requiring both sexes to produce viable seed.  They can be extremely promiscuous resulting in some unusual and beautiful hybrids.  All others are hermaphrodite thus combining characteristics of both sexes.

Many of the Proteaceae and their numerous companion plants commonly called “Fynbos” are perfectly suited to Hippo Lakes and Protea Pride which has a very similar weather condition as the south western cape in South Africa.

James Wood, who with his father and a handful of others pioneered the commercialisation of these exotic flowers in the 1950’s, is still picking, processing and packing for export to Japan and the Australian flower markets.

The Wood family are indeed most fortunate to have lived close to this Flora Kingdom covering mountain slopes, valleys and flats down to the sea; and in their own small way bridge the two continents that were once 300 million years ago joined as a large land mass.

The Proteaceae are an ancient family, probably one of the oldest groups of flowering plants.  The ancestors of todays proteas growing at Hippo Lakes and Protea Pride were present in Gondwanaland long before it began breaking up 300 million years ago at a time when Australia and Africa were part of a large land mass.  Proteaceae were divided into two sub-families; Proteoideae and Grevilleoideae.

The South African Proteaceae family is divided into 13 natural groups.  Of these Aulax and Leucadendron are dioecious, being separate male and female plants, requiring both sexes to produce viable seed.  They can be extremely promiscuous resulting in some unusual and beautiful hybrids.  All others are hermaphrodite thus combining characteristics of both sexes.

Many of the Proteaceae and their numerous companion plants commonly called “Fynbos” are perfectly suited to Hippo Lakes and Protea Pride which has a very similar weather condition as the south western cape in South Africa.

James Wood, who with his father and a handful of others pioneered the commercialisation of these exotic flowers in the 1950’s, is still picking, processing and packing for export to Japan and the Australian flower markets.

The Wood family are indeed most fortunate to have lived close to this Flora Kingdom covering mountain slopes, valleys and flats down to the sea; and in their own small way bridge the two continents that were once 300 million years ago joined as a large land mass.